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The Myths That Made America: An Introduction to American Studies

Large book cover: The Myths That Made America: An Introduction to American Studies

The Myths That Made America: An Introduction to American Studies
by

Publisher: transcript Verlag
ISBN/ASIN: 3837614859
ISBN-13: 9783837614855
Number of pages: 451

Description:
This essential introduction to American studies examines the core foundational myths upon which the nation is based and which still determine discussions of US-American identities today. These myths include the myth of 'discovery', the Pocahontas myth, the myth of the Promised Land, the myth of the Founding Fathers, the melting pot myth, the myth of the West, and the myth of the self-made man.

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